The Sharp Edge of a Snowflake Review


Title: The Sharp Edge of a Snowflake
Author: Sif Sigmarsdóttir
Publisher: Hodder Children's Books
Publication Date: 07 June 2019
Source: Pan Macmillan South Africa
Format: Paperback
Pages: 364
Rating: 3.75 Stars 

Goodreads Synopsis:


The captivating, feminist, Nordic YA thriller from Sif Sigmarsdottir. The snow is falling thick and fast now. Snow in Iceland is dangerous.

Hannah Eiríksdóttir has been banished from her home in London to a place of eternal punishment for the wicked. No, not Hell, but close: Iceland. There, she faces a new life working as a journalist for her father's newspaper - a man she barely knows.


Imogen Collins has the perfect life as a social media influencer, showing off her glamorous London existence to adoring fans. But behind the filters lies a dark secret. She thought she'd buried it: But the Beast is back - a ghost from her past who's threatening to ruin her future.

When a man is found murdered at the edge of the road in snowy Iceland the girls' lives collide. Imogen had the motive. Can Hannah find out the truth, and discover the reality of the girl beneath the filters?

Behind perfection often lies unbearable ugliness.

Book Review:

Pre-reading Thoughts:

I was really excited when the amazing people over at Pan Macmillan SA recommended this book to me for #thrilltober. The cover design is amazing and it makes me so excited to dive into the book! I also think that this book sounds really interesting.

Thank you so much to Pan Macmillan South Africa for providing me with a copy of this book! Just a quick disclaimer for those reading this review, I have received this book for free. Please note that this does not affect my opinions in any way. All thoughts are my own.

Writing Thoughts:

The inclusion of Instagram posts adds to the story that the author is trying to tell. It added a lot of insight into the message or idea that the book was trying to convert as well as adding a lot of insight into what the characters were thinking. I found that writing had a good balance between description and dialogue. The double point of view adds to the storyline by creating a lot of tension. 

Plot Thoughts:

The plot kept me invested as it dealt not only with a murder investigation but it also addresses important social issues. I enjoyed that the two-point of views also take place at two different timelines. The plot had a good balance between being predictable and surprising me. I loved how the two timelines came together at the end. When viewing the plot on its own, it doesn't seem as though a lot has happened. However, I loved how all the small details seemed to add up to a book that I couldn't stop reading. 

Character Thoughts:

Hannah and Imogen are two different characters that face two different sets of problems. I found myself quite invested in who they were and everything that had happened to them. Hannah is still reeling from the loss of her mother and is unsure of how she can possibly form a connection with her father and his new family. Imogen is having to deal with something she never thought she would ever have to. She is all alone and doesn't know who she can turn to for support. Both characters are two individuals who are at a loss of where they should turn for help. I loved how they both constantly seemed to bump into each other.

Final Thoughts:

Overall, I really enjoyed this book. I found myself drawn to it from the moment I received it at the beginning of the month. The writing was well-paced and made excellent use of the two-point of views that it presented. The plot was intricate and although it had its predictable moments, there were times where I was pleasantly surprised. The characters definitely made this book for me. I found myself invested in their lives and was intrigued to see how everything would unfold. This is one thriller that I would recommend to anyone. It was easy to follow and a quick read that had me thinking about it whenever I wasn't reading it. Thank you so much to Pan Macmillan South Africa for providing me with a copy of this book. 

Yours in Reading,
Melleny

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